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26 Oct 2018

Researchers from Queen’s University Belfast and the University of Leeds, as part of a pan-European partnership called the European Cancer Concord (ECC) ®, have won the prestigious 2018 European Health Award.

This award honours initiatives that help tackle some of Europe’s most pressing health challenges.

 

The award-winning project, entitled ‘The European Cancer Patient’s Bill of Rights: A Catalyst for Change and an empowerment tool for cancer patients across Europe’ involves an equal partnership between cancer patients, healthcare professionals and cancer researchers.

Professor Mark Lawler, Vice President of the European Cancer Concord (ECC), today received the award on behalf of ECCO during the opening ceremony of the European Health Forum Gastein, the premier European Health Policy Conference and an official event of the Austrian European Council Presidency. 

25 Jul 2018

Susan Richman from the Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology obtained £1120 from the Medical Research Council (MRC)  to fund a stand  at the MRC’s Festival of Medical Research.  The stand titled, ‘So, just what is personalised Medicine?’ was split into three sections, with the first aiming to bust the stigma around bowel cancer screening, incorporating a game and a competition.

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Breakthrough Discovery in Fight against Bowel Cancer
31 May 2017

For clinicians, treating patients with bowel cancer can be particularly challenging. Professor Mark Lawler, Chair in Translational Genomics, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology at Queen’s and joint Senior Author on the study explains: “Currently patients with colorectal cancer are offered chemotherapy treatment. While this treatment may be successful for some patients, for others it will have no effect on fighting the cancer, though the patients may suffer debilitating side effects such as nerve damage that can result in a loss of sensation or movement in a part of the body. A ‘one size fits all’ approach isn’t a viable option if we are to effectively tackle this disease.”

Researchers at Queen’s, in collaboration with the University of Oxford and the University of Leeds have made a significant advance in the treatment of bowel cancer. The study, which has been published in the high impact journal Nature Communications, has shown how defining precise gene signatures within bowel cancer cells can allow us to develop novel prognostic and predictive markers for bowel cancer and help to drive personalised medicine approaches.

Dr Philip Dunne, Senior Research Fellow at Queen’s said: “Through analysing the molecular and genetic data generated from patient tissue samples, we have discovered that there are different subtypes of bowel cancer. This research unequivocally identifies robust gene signatures that can be used to inform patient management. It will allow us to identify particular gene signatures that indicate sensitivity or resistance to specific therapies. Thus, we can tailor treatment to the individual patient, maximising its effectiveness while minimising potential side effects.”

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